Fine/Street Art/Food

We had a very, very lazy morning. Most of it was our doing and some of it, if only a tinsy bit, was the hostel’s fault. We woke up at 9 a.m. and spent a half hour reading. Then we decided it was time to get some breakfast before it ended. While Doug was doing our breakfast dishes, Lynn went to ask the hostel if our laundry was finished. It was not, but should be by soon. So we returned to our room and continued to read/write yesterday’s blog. At around 11:00 a.m. we asked again. “Are the clothes for room 3 ready?” Nope. Still not ready. But this time they called the lavanderia and let us know that they would be coming in 10 minutes. At 11:30 a.m. they were finally here and we were ready for them.

Apparently breakfast wasn’t filling enough for Doug, so our first goal for the afternoon would be to get some lunch. We both enjoyed our seafood market experience the last time we were here so we thought we would give it a go again, but this time we would head to Tio Willy’s which was advertised on our free walking tour map. Well, it turns out that this was a very poor decision. Lynn’s seafood medley was not spicy as desired, but instead covered in a pool of butter. Doug’s situation was much worse. He ordered sea bass, grilled, but received it steamed and mostly raw. Though he didn’t want to, he sent it back with a tentative “frio” gesture to our waitress. His plate was brought back into the kitchen only to return with the same fish, more steamed, but not good. As Doug said, “It’s concerning when a restaurant at the fish market doesn’t know how to cook fish.” Hopefully we don’t get food poisoning.

To brighten up Doug’s day a bit, we plied him with more ice cream and then did a tour of the nearby Bella Artes museum that we had missed out on last time. The very nice security guard let us borrow 100 pesos so that we could store our bag in a locker while we roamed the two floors. The bottom featured some Mexican artists who seemed to favor gruesome Christian themes while the top supposedly centered around gender androgyny. We didn’t really get it. It just seemed like a lot of fine art featuring human scenes from various centuries. We most certainly had a favorite though. Imagine an oil panting of Ray Romano’s head giving you a “What’s up ladies?” head turn while floating in a circle of clouds. Yes, it was glorious. Unfortunately no photos were allowed, so here is a reproduction…

"Hey, ladies..."
“Hey ladies…” Side Note: This will be Lynn’s Halloween costume.
Doug outside of Bella Artes.
Doug outside of Bella Artes. No offense, Ray, but Doug is far more handsome than you. Maybe Lynn should take up painting and put his face in clouds.

From there we headed into the Bellavista neighborhood for a good walk. This area is known for its street art so we took some time wandering the streets attempting to find the best. Most of it was sadly tags, but we saw a few that piqued our fancy with their bright colors and clear talent.

We then made a brief stop at our hostel to use the facilities (Yes, you needed to know that otherwise this post would continue to be very boring) before we went to check out the Italian neighborhood. This area was recommended to us by our Tours4Tips guide a week ago and ever since then Lynn had a hankering for cannolis. So, that was our next mission. Find Lynn some cannolis. Again… no such luck. Italian neighborhood does not seem to mean what we Americans think it means back home. Sure there were less completo stands (but still a good chunk), but only a handful of Italian restaurants/cafes in the 2 miles we walked. And, no cannolis. Lynn’s new goal for her return: learn how to make cannolis (::cough:: and get a job ::cough::).

We continued to get our walk on by heading from here to the grocery store to get some supplies for our long flight to Colombia tomorrow. On the menu: trail mix and peaches. Yum! Then we were off back to our hostel for some rest before dinner.

We planned dinner to be at Peumayan Ancestral Food in hopes of getting some real Chilean food, not french fries covered in fried eggs and meat. But, we didn’t make a reservation so we’d be gambling that we’d actually make it in. When we arrived at 8:45 p.m. we were told, apologetically, that they only had one two person table and that was a good thing because that was all we needed. So we sat down and enjoyed a very pleasant and surprising meal of delicious goodies. It was a fabulous last night in the very wonderful country of Chile.

Some amuse bouche to start.
Some amuse bouche to start.
A tour of breads from the north of Chile to the south.
A tour of breads from the north of Chile to the south.
Palate cleanser of fried plantains and an onion spread.
Palate cleanser of fried plantains and an onion spread.
Display of starters. Highlights were the sweetbreads (2nd from left) and snail/seaweed salad (furthest right).
Display of starters. Highlights were the sweetbreads (2nd from left) and snail/seaweed salad (furthest right).
Fried seaweed.
Fried seaweed.
Rabbit and llama stew.
Rabbit and llama stew.
Oxtail fatty deliciousness.
Oxtail fatty deliciousness.
Rica-rica in chocolate. Yum.
Rica-rica in chocolate. Yum.
IMG_20160225_221231399
All paired with a very pleasing wine.

Daily Walking Mileage: 10.6

Fun Facts:

  • Bolivian election results are in: Evo, No!!
  • There is a restaurant here called Buffalo Waffles. It disappointingly does not serve buffalo chicken and waffles. Doug is beside himself.
  • If you know anything about us, you know that we like to call ourselves the “Farrelliones.” So, we were absolutely STUNNED to learn that there is a Farellones village and ski resort outside of Santiago in the Andes. Even better is that a visitor misspelled it like our combined last name. We will definitely need to come back for some snowboarding.

One thought on “Fine/Street Art/Food

Leave a Reply to Judy Cancel reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *